When most think of wrestling the very next thought is going to be WWE. But Old Town Peoria Arizona has a family friendly gem of entertainment that can be compared and, depending who you talk to; blow way other cities independent wrestling scenes.

April Peirson has been going to independent wrestling shows since 2013, she goes to indy shows at least once a week but really enjoys the ones she sees in Peoria.

“I have been to shows in Texas (too) and the crowds from Peoria are a lot louder and get into the show more,” she said.

The crowd can make or break a show depending on its reaction to the wrestlers and the matches, not only for the other on lookers but for the wrestlers as well

“I enjoyed wrestling in Peoria because it was a new crowd and it was a pretty easy crowd,” female wrestler Ruby Raze said. “When I spoke to the crowd, they spoke back and that’s always a great thing.”

But her time in Peoria wasn’t all roses.

“I’m kind of mad at them though, at one given point in the match I asked the crowd to point me to a camera and they did, and I gave my opponent a great arm bar and I never saw the picture,” she said jokingly.

Raze is based in California and has been a part of wrestling promotions in eight states, either as a manager or as a wrestler, and she felt the Peoria crowd was really involved.

“The crowd was very welcoming to me,” she said. “They cheered when I entered; got sad when I didn’t high five them, cowered when I hit my opponent, and there were even a couple of signs in the crowd made for me. The crowd in Peoria played with me as much as I played with them.”

She’s not the only one that feels this way.

“The crowd participates very well. (It is) full of life and is loud … I wouldn’t have it any other way,” wrestler Chris Evans said.

He did point out one major difference between wrestling in Peoria compared to other places.

“It’s more family friendly and I can go out and just have fun and I know they will enjoy it,” he said. “Opposed to wrestling in California where the fans know all the tricks. (They) will eat you alive and tell you that you suck if you mess up.”

Jared Devitt, co-owner of Arizona Wrestling Federation, which is the main promotion in Peoria, did not respond for comment.

When most think of wrestling the very next thought is going to be WWE. But Old Town Peoria has a family friendly gem of entertainment that can be compared and, depending who you talk to; blow way other cities independent wrestling scenes.

April Peirson has been going to independent wrestling shows since 2013, she goes to indy shows at least once a week but really enjoys the ones she sees in Peoria.

“I have been to shows in Texas (too) and the crowds from Peoria are a lot louder and get into the show more,” she said.

The crowd can make or break a show depending on its reaction to the wrestlers and the matches, not only for the other on lookers but for the wrestlers as well

“I enjoyed wrestling in Peoria because it was a new crowd and it was a pretty easy crowd,” female wrestler Ruby Raze said. “When I spoke to the crowd, they spoke back and that’s always a great thing.”

But her time in Peoria wasn’t all roses.

“I’m kind of mad at them though, at one given point in the match I asked the crowd to point me to a camera and they did, and I gave my opponent a great arm bar and I never saw the picture,” she said jokingly.

Raze is based in California and has been a part of wrestling promotions in eight states, either as a manager or as a wrestler, and she felt the Peoria crowd was really involved.

“The crowd was very welcoming to me,” she said. “They cheered when I entered; got sad when I didn’t high five them, cowered when I hit my opponent, and there were even a couple of signs in the crowd made for me. The crowd in Peoria played with me as much as I played with them.”

She’s not the only one that feels this way.

“The crowd participates very well. (It is) full of life and is loud … I wouldn’t have it any other way,” wrestler Chris Evans said.

He did point out one major difference between wrestling in Peoria compared to other places.

“It’s more family friendly and I can go out and just have fun and I know they will enjoy it,” he said. “Opposed to wrestling in California where the fans know all the tricks. (They) will eat you alive and tell you that you suck if you mess up.”

Jared Devitt, co-owner of Arizona Wrestling Federation, which is the main promotion in Peoria, did not respond for comment.

When most think of wrestling the very next thought is going to be WWE. But Old Town Peoria has a family friendly gem of entertainment that can be compared and, depending who you talk to; blow way other cities independent wrestling scenes.

April Peirson has been going to independent wrestling shows since 2013, she goes to indy shows at least once a week but really enjoys the ones she sees in Peoria.

“I have been to shows in Texas (too) and the crowds from Peoria are a lot louder and get into the show more,” she said.

The crowd can make or break a show depending on its reaction to the wrestlers and the matches, not only for the other on lookers but for the wrestlers as well

“I enjoyed wrestling in Peoria because it was a new crowd and it was a pretty easy crowd,” female wrestler Ruby Raze said. “When I spoke to the crowd, they spoke back and that’s always a great thing.”

But her time in Peoria wasn’t all roses.

“I’m kind of mad at them though, at one given point in the match I asked the crowd to point me to a camera and they did, and I gave my opponent a great arm bar and I never saw the picture,” she said jokingly.

Raze is based in California and has been a part of wrestling promotions in eight states, either as a manager or as a wrestler, and she felt the Peoria crowd was really involved.

“The crowd was very welcoming to me,” she said. “They cheered when I entered; got sad when I didn’t high five them, cowered when I hit my opponent, and there were even a couple of signs in the crowd made for me. The crowd in Peoria played with me as much as I played with them.”

She’s not the only one that feels this way.

“The crowd participates very well. (It is) full of life and is loud … I wouldn’t have it any other way,” wrestler Chris Evans said.

He did point out one major difference between wrestling in Peoria compared to other places.

“It’s more family friendly and I can go out and just have fun and I know they will enjoy it,” he said. “Opposed to wrestling in California where the fans know all the tricks. (They) will eat you alive and tell you that you suck if you mess up.”

Jared Devitt, co-owner of Arizona Wrestling Federation, which is the main promotion in Peoria, did not respond for comment.

When most think of wrestling the very next thought is going to be WWE. But Old Town Peoria has a family friendly gem of entertainment that can be compared and, depending who you talk to; blow way other cities independent wrestling scenes.

April Peirson has been going to independent wrestling shows since 2013, she goes to indy shows at least once a week but really enjoys the ones she sees in Peoria.

“I have been to shows in Texas (too) and the crowds from Peoria are a lot louder and get into the show more,” she said.

The crowd can make or break a show depending on its reaction to the wrestlers and the matches, not only for the other on lookers but for the wrestlers as well

“I enjoyed wrestling in Peoria because it was a new crowd and it was a pretty easy crowd,” female wrestler Ruby Raze said. “When I spoke to the crowd, they spoke back and that’s always a great thing.”

But her time in Peoria wasn’t all roses.

“I’m kind of mad at them though, at one given point in the match I asked the crowd to point me to a camera and they did, and I gave my opponent a great arm bar and I never saw the picture,” she said jokingly.

Raze is based in California and has been a part of wrestling promotions in eight states, either as a manager or as a wrestler, and she felt the Peoria crowd was really involved.

“The crowd was very welcoming to me,” she said. “They cheered when I entered; got sad when I didn’t high five them, cowered when I hit my opponent, and there were even a couple of signs in the crowd made for me. The crowd in Peoria played with me as much as I played with them.”

She’s not the only one that feels this way.

“The crowd participates very well. (It is) full of life and is loud … I wouldn’t have it any other way,” wrestler Chris Evans said.

He did point out one major difference between wrestling in Peoria compared to other places.

“It’s more family friendly and I can go out and just have fun and I know they will enjoy it,” he said. “Opposed to wrestling in California where the fans know all the tricks. (They) will eat you alive and tell you that you suck if you mess up.”

Jared Devitt, co-owner of Arizona Wrestling Federation, which is the main promotion in Peoria, did not respond for comment.

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